5 steps to put people first & cultivate a winning brand

5 steps to put people first & cultivate a winning brand

More and more, employers are recognizing that HR must shift its orientation from human resources to human relationships. Since the oldest Millennials entered the workplace around the turn of the new millennium, employee engagement and satisfaction has jetted to the top of executive agendas. Putting people first is the key to a winning brand. Over our three years of CultureQ® research into Brand Leadership, Good Citizenship and Favorite Brands, participants ranked treating employees well and fairly as the number-one characteristic of a good corporate citizen, and the number-two trait of a leadership brand (behind the characteristic “produces reliable, durable products and services and offers value for quality”). A 2014 CultureQ study into how people define their ideal employer revealed that Millennials (the oldest of whom are now in their mid-30’s), more so than Baby Boomers and Gen Xers, seek a friendly, supportive work environment; opportunities for social engagement; a commitment to volunteerism; good values; and a leadership reputation. Deloitte, PWC, McKinsey and many others have conducted studies that have uncovered similar insights. And when the Supreme Court decision for Obergefell v. Hodges made same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states in the U.S. in 2015, numerous media pundits proclaimed that embracing the rainbow was smart business because Millennials were a more diverse and inclusive generation. Millennials are not the first generation looking to be treated well and fairly by their employers. Companies have contemplated ways to cultivate a happy workforce for decades, if not centuries. Indeed, since the height of the Industrial Revolution employers have equated employee benefits with the output of higher-quality products and better employee recruitment and...
Transcending the customer: Successful brands solve personal ME worries & solve global WE concerns

Transcending the customer: Successful brands solve personal ME worries & solve global WE concerns

OVERVIEW People’s expectations of government, business and other longstanding institutions have been shifting since 2008.. And, perhaps more so than anything, Brexit and the US Presidential race prove there’s no going back. Business as usual—with ‘leaders’ running the show and people going along for the ride—no longer speaks to the needs, longings, and practical realities of our modern society. So, it’s no surprise that in a populist world, people are looking to the brands they value the most to have a meaningful purpose and mirror their values. FROM PUSH MARKETING TO BRAND PULL Since the late 1990’s, every agency, research company, consultancy and digital firm has hung out a branding shingle. And as they have, the word brand itself has acquired a lot of baggage. Ask any two people what a brand is and more likely than not they’ll give you two different answers, although each will associate the word in some way with creating a cool name, developing an eye-catching logo, crafting a memorable tagline or spending a lot of money on multi-media ad campaigns designed to build awareness. In other words, for most people the discipline of branding is a form of push marketing that leverages advertising and attention grabbing tactics often disconnected from delivering real value for users. Rather than being judged as a strategic investment designed to cultivate loyalty with customers, employees, business partners, suppliers, investors and other stakeholders – and thereby enhance profitability – brand development is often slated as a cost to business in financial analysis. Yet, brands matter more than ever today. In a digital and socially driven marketplace where the lines...
5 Steps for Brands to Do Good – for customers, employees, other stakeholders, society & the planet

5 Steps for Brands to Do Good – for customers, employees, other stakeholders, society & the planet

The playing field for marketing has changed. Business as usual—with marketers and ad agencies running the show and consumers coming along for the ride—no longer speaks to the needs, longings, and practical realities of our modern society. The global economy, technology, climate change, and generational shifts have all dramatically impacted the ways in which we all consume, engage, and even abandon the brands in our lives. The unprecedented level of transparency social media has generated places great power in the hands of consumers. People want more from companies than ever before: better value, better service, better ethics, and a better focus on sustainability. Brands, especially the ones we’re most loyal to, represent more than things and services. They signify an ethos—one that mirrors our values or that we aspire to. As consumers grow more concerned with fairness and sustainability, they – in other words we – naturally seek “relationships” with brands that link us to a larger purpose, simultaneously enriching our modern lives and sustaining the planet. So it’s no surprise that more consumers are calling for, yearning for—and paying for—brands to do good for their customers, their employees, other stakeholders, and the world. A 5-Step Model to Do Good Our 5-step model of Brand Citizenship® is not about sacrificing to better the world. Nor is it boasting about sustainability or social responsibility efforts. It is about integrating do good activities such as fair employee policies, CSR, sustainability programs, ethical sourcing, charitable giving, etc., with brand development to strengthen a brand’s reputation, foster greater loyalty, and enhance value creation. The 5 Steps Step 1: TRUST: Don’t let me down....

Clarity, Context, Conversation, Community: 4 C’s for brand development in a social, mutual economy

Over the past three years, insights on leadership and favorite brands from Onesixtyfourth’s ongoing CultureQ qualitative and quantitative research project demonstrate that we are entering a new era for business, one that is characterized by mutual benefit and win-win-win. Welcome to the new normal People have accepted that daily life will remain uncertain. While anxiety levels about what tomorrow will bring may not be as high as they were at the peak of the recession, they have not disappeared. Participants in our CultureQ research tell us they are concerned about security, poverty, injustice, sustainability and most especially their own futures. And, after years of inaction and waiting for things to change, they have accepted this state as the new normal and are proactively seeking ways to move forward in their lives. With divisiveness and obstruction a theme on the geopolitical front, people are looking for symbols of unity, tangible things that demonstrate the global interconnectivity that technology fosters. Connections that have a positive impact on daily living. They want to feel in control of their own lives and participate in creating solutions that will better society. With faith in government and political leaders low, many would rather partner with businesses – most especially the brands they love – noting that they are more likely than government to be effective in solving the very real challenges we face, as individuals, as countrymen and as global citizens. Leaders of all kinds share the same characteristics The seven characteristics participants in our research point to when describing ideal leaders, in general, apply as much to brands as they do politicians: Visionary: inspire...

Can brands help Millennials feel more optimistic about the world and confident about their lives?

CultureQ research continues to show Millennials rely on favorite brands to feel more emotionally balanced and psychologically fulfilled.  Our latest insights reveal five ways brands can develop more valuable relationships with Millennials. 1. Fill the leadership void Millennials top five concerns continue to indicate they’re a generation that’s ill at ease, as uncertainty is a permanent feature of their lives. Younger Millennials (16-18) still in high school express concern about weighty global issues (the global economy, political instability, terrorism, environmental sustainability). And are fearful about how the permanent state of uncertainty impacts them personally - preserving their quality of life, achieving longer term security and/or giving their families what they need. As Millennials age and transition more into adulthood, the lack of access to affordable healthcare is a growing worry, despite the launch of Obamacare. They also express increasing concern about the environment and the lack of visionary leadership in government, overall. More and more, Millennials will gravitate to brands with propositions that empower them to feel more secure and confident about their future and that of the planet. Their loyalty is strongest toward brands that fill the leadership void and embed solutions that solve societal issues into their promise. Brands that center on healthcare, education, financial security, and personal wealth are exceptionally poised to do this. 2. Be safe enough to be real Many Millennials are struggling with social media dissonance; the term we use to describe the gap between their off and online identities. As this syndrome becomes more widespread, and exacerbated by legacies of helicopter parenting and over scheduling which have left Millennials little opportunity to...

J.C. Penney: we learned to listen to you

To secure loyalty, a brand’s experience should reflect its consumers’ values, lifestyles and interests, sincerely deliver its promise and credibly reflect its heritage. People want to see themselves as part of the brand; sometimes a slightly more polished version but never a dramatically different persona that feels out of step with their life. Given this shifting context, when J.C. Penney evolved the brand experience to woo a younger target audience, their core audience was right to feel misplaced. Under ex-CEO and former Apple Executive, Ron Johnson, J.C. Penney, first established in the frontier lands of Wyoming in 1902 for miners and farming families, looked to become “a happy place to hang out.” Coupons were ditched in favor of everyday low pricing and old faithful lines were displaced. Check out by smart phone and Wi-Fi hot spots were central to Millennialize the retail experience and appeal to more affluent consumers. J.C. Penney’s heartland clientele did not recognize their reliable go-to brand, which to this day prides itself on its commitment to make “everyday matter.” How could this national institution believably transform overnight into Apple’s much older sister? Many labeled it an awkward branding jumble; and one that resulted in disastrous sales. At Onesixtyfourth, we believe brands should mirror societal shifts. And CultureQ, our proprietary tracker of sentiment reveals that men and women across cohorts are growing more and more tired of divisiveness in all areas of their lives; the haves vs the have nots, the young vs the over the 40’s, Republican vs Democrat, it goes on. So, what’s the impact of such divisions, and often, artificial separations imposed by...
Page 1 of 3123