Millennials and Libertarian ideals

With the Presidential election fast approaching, politics have been top of mind for many of the Millennials we’ve been speaking to in the US through CultureQ.  In research last December, many started to express Libertarian-like ideals, mostly in response to SOPA, which had the potential to impinge upon their right to on-demand entertainment. Two thirds of registered Millennials backed President Barack Obama and his promise to deliver a “change we can believe in” in 2008. Yet, today, many of those same voters feel that while their candidate won, they have still lost. Current numbers show that less than half of younger voters plan to take part in the coming election compared to almost 70% for 2008. So where have all these Millennials gone? Sadly, a large segment likely will not vote, but many of the others have chosen a new standard bearer, the Libertarian Party. It’s not surprising, when you think about it. Libertarian ideals are perfect for Millennials; both groups favor open and transparent systems and feel that the government should not be involved with the minutiae of everyday life. Millennials, who have been empowered by technology since a young age and are entering the workforce during a prolonged downturn, feel that the political system is broken and needs to be fixed. Like Obama in 2008, Libertarians represent an anti-establishment movement.  They fit the bill many Millennials are seeking - they berate government intervention. Recently, there has been a surge in support among youth for Libertarian candidates, the highest profile being Representative Ron Paul of Texas. Many CultureQ participants qualitatively and quantitatively spoke about Paul.  And, despite him not...
The Creative Capital for Hipsters

The Creative Capital for Hipsters

Choosing where you live determines a number of important things: whether or not you need a car, if you will live in a house or an apartment, and in it’s own way the types of industries you can work in.  What we don’t usually consider is that sometimes the decision of where to live was made for us on a more subconscious level. Research has been done recently on this by psychologists at Cambridge and the University of Texas. One thing that pops up when you speak to Millennials deciding on where to live is where are the creatives, those who are often associated with being open and embracing new experiences, moving. These are the people who are going out and effecting change in the world as entrepreneurs, business leaders, and social enterprisers. The notable hot spots for creatives today are San Francisco, New York, Austin, Nashville, and Denver (in terms of being open to experience). One place that is surprisingly left off the map, though, is a small city in the smallest state, Providence. I don’t think that it is coincidence that this New England city shares its name with human destiny. In fact that is how Providence got its name in 1636, from Roger Williams as he was a religious exile from the Puritan Massachusets Bay Colony. Since Williams’ time, the city has grown organically and seen much change. Just look at the various monikers that have developed, “The Beehive of Industry,” ” The Rennaisance City,” and now “The Creative Capital.” It should not come as a surprise that Providence attracts a creative and intellectual population; Brown...