Can brands help Millennials feel more optimistic about the world and confident about their lives?

CultureQ research continues to show Millennials rely on favorite brands to feel more emotionally balanced and psychologically fulfilled.  Our latest insights reveal five ways brands can develop more valuable relationships with Millennials. 1. Fill the leadership void Millennials top five concerns continue to indicate they’re a generation that’s ill at ease, as uncertainty is a permanent feature of their lives. Younger Millennials (16-18) still in high school express concern about weighty global issues (the global economy, political instability, terrorism, environmental sustainability). And are fearful about how the permanent state of uncertainty impacts them personally - preserving their quality of life, achieving longer term security and/or giving their families what they need. As Millennials age and transition more into adulthood, the lack of access to affordable healthcare is a growing worry, despite the launch of Obamacare. They also express increasing concern about the environment and the lack of visionary leadership in government, overall. More and more, Millennials will gravitate to brands with propositions that empower them to feel more secure and confident about their future and that of the planet. Their loyalty is strongest toward brands that fill the leadership void and embed solutions that solve societal issues into their promise. Brands that center on healthcare, education, financial security, and personal wealth are exceptionally poised to do this. 2. Be safe enough to be real Many Millennials are struggling with social media dissonance; the term we use to describe the gap between their off and online identities. As this syndrome becomes more widespread, and exacerbated by legacies of helicopter parenting and over scheduling which have left Millennials little opportunity to...
Is your corporate culture similar to that of a Crew Team, a Country Club or a Boy & Girl Scouts Club?

Is your corporate culture similar to that of a Crew Team, a Country Club or a Boy & Girl Scouts Club?

Acts of management shape employer culture Together, each action – big or small – of the employees of a company forms our impressions of a brand. And, each act of management in turn shapes employees’ impressions of their employer. When a company’s brand – its culture and values that promote management behaviors – is relevant to employees, they are more engaged, provide better customer experiences and, thereby, ultimately enhance profitability. Recent research from CultureQ, Onesixtyfourth’s ongoing monitor of how cultural sentiment is impacting people’s relationships with brands, reveals that Millennials, Gen Xers and Baby Boomers each define their ideal employer culture differently. What is your company culture?                   Would you describe your company culture as similar to that of a Crew Team, a Country Club or a Boy & Girl Scouts Club? Your answer to this question may offer some insight to why you are or are not having a tough time attracting new recruits. Boomers tend to prefer an office environment that is positive and healthy. A culture similar to that of a winning Crew Team: recognition and acknowledgement of hard work, a team-like work ethos, the individual strengths and skillsets that need to come together to do good work, accountability and pride that comes from a job well done. Gen Xers on the other hand, are looking for a work environment that supports, enhances and thereby actualizes their lifestyle – what many envision as Silicon Valley workplace culture or what we think of as a Country Club. As detailed in our blog last month, Our changing workplace: Cultural shifts...

Are Millennials more trusting?

With so many headlines focusing on privacy concerns, last week we decided to ask CultureQ participants what they thought. And, here’s the overview of what we learned: •Overall, Millennials are either more trusting or just less concerned about privacy issues than Xers and Boomers; •Facebook is of greater concern to Millennials and Boomers than Google; and of equal concern to GenXers; and, •More people are concerned about the news media accessing their data than we...

3-2-1…Make a difference

The conversation about brands doing good is become more and more mainstream. And, as it is, more and more of our CultureQ respondents are telling us that businesses soon will no longer have a choice but to participate. But, how do you start? It’s a big world out there. What can your brand be doing to enrich people’s lives? The idea of doing good and impacting positive change feels formidable to many brands. Some days, it even may seem at odds with business objectives.  So, to make Brand Citizenship more than just talk or a one-off initiative, we’ve developed an easy to follow process for developing initiatives and ultimately one strong direction. Remember, it’s ok to start small as long as you think big! 3  Gain a Holistic Perspective. Identify and assess your…. Brand Beliefs – What do you believe in? What benefits does your brand deliver? How is your brand making consumers’ daily routines easier and enriching their lives? Stakeholder Values – How do your different stakeholders define the value of your proposition? How do they think you make people’s lives easier or better? How do you take people along to make a difference? Community Impact – In what ways, no matter how small, can you make a more of a difference? What things do you believe in that your brand take a stand on? How can you build bridges between disconnected communities? How can you ladder the benefits you deliver to your consumers up to connect them to something bigger than themselves? When you step back and see the gaps a cause, a dream, a vision emerges....

Brand Citizenship®: a 360 model democratizing CSR

Weary of being frustrated consumers want to be involved in creating a more positive future As we’ve again been reviewing participants’ hopes, dreams and fears for 2013 from our last round of CultureQ quant, we can’t help but be reminded that people are seeking greater signs of unity.  Our respondents in both the US and the UK are tired of the divisiveness that they perceive is preventing politicians from finding solutions to our most pressing economic and societal challenges.  Yearning to become CEOs in control of their own lives they again emphasize that they’re seeking products and services that help and their families them simplify routines and simultaneously inspire day-to-day living, aid the planet and help society at large.  Overall, many of our participants now appear to have accepted that they’re living in a new normal; they’re somewhat weary of being frustrated and want to be involved in shaping the solution - in creating a more positive future.  As one eloquently stated, “I hope to become the change you want to see in the world, make choices that will impact my community for the better.” Brand Citizenship aligns sustainability and other social responsibility concepts with individual product and service brand propositions And, here’s where Brand Citizenship fits in so perfectly.  Through laddering initiatives up from meeting an individual consumer’s needs to enriching people’s lives and bettering society, it aligns sustainability and other social responsibility concepts with individual product and service brand propositions, rather than managing them solely at corporate levels.  In doing so, it enables consumers to co-create the future alongside corporations through choosing to purchase products and services...
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